About your Search

20130318
20130326
SHOW
Book TV 13
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 44
CSPAN 30
CSPAN2 30
CNNW 29
KQED (PBS) 11
KTVU (FOX) 10
SFGTV2 8
FBC 6
KGO (ABC) 4
KNTV (NBC) 4
KQEH (PBS) 4
SFGTV 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 230
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 230 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the civil rights movment." he joins us from washington. on the good to have you program. >> i wish i could be with you. wish we could have you in the studio. you have spent basically your life working on this icon a trilogy, and then you end up with a book that basically distills it all down. why did you do this? >> teachers have told me for many years that while they love the story, 800-page books are a little much to assign college students, let alone high school, and that weighed on me. the other thing is that it has been 50 years since the crest of the movement, and america's still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that -- america still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that. there are still many people hiding from the great benefits of the 1960's, so i wanted to do something to crystallize that. the lessons from the people in the civil rights era. tavis: what lessons do you think that the american public, by and large, as we approached the anniversary -- we will talk about that in a moment -- what do they still seem blind to? >> george wallace pledg
anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
in civil rights and anti-war protests and many of his subsequent writings reflects his experiences by stressing the importance of grassroots political activity in the african-american freedom struggle. his first book, end struggle snick and the black awakening of the 1960s remains a definitive history of student nonviolent coordinating committee, one of the most dynamic and innovative civil rights organizations of our time. he served as senior advisor for a 14-part award winning public television series on civil rights entitled "eyes on the prize." i know we all remember that. (applause) >> his recent, his recent publication, the book, martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr., a memoir about his transition from being a teenage participant in the march on washington to becoming a historian and an educator and, of course, if you sign up for a membership you can get that book today. it's here. in 1985 he was invited by coretta scott king to direct a long-term project to edit and publish the definitive multi-volume edition, the papers of martin luther kinder
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her courageous and declaring -- for her courageousness and declaring february 4th rosa parks day in san francisco. (applause) >> i thought you might like that. i'm done. thank you. [laughter] >> thank you. supervisor. and now there are a couple other people, sheriff mirkarimi has joined us. [speaker not understood] is in the room with us as well. reverend amos brown is with us. welcome. (applause) >> now supervisor breed will bring us brief remarks. >> hi, everybody. (applause) >> so happy to see all your smiling faces in the audience. happy black history month. i bring you greetings on behalf of district 5 in our great city. thank you, mr. mayor, for opening up city hall to my colleague, supervisor cohen, and my distinguished colleagues sitting here in the front row on the board of supervisors. it's truly an honor to stand before you on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years
leads the doj's civil rights division and could wind up being the next u.s. labor secretary. a cabinet member who will play a key role in the the president's efforts to raise the minimum wage and reform immigration laws among many other responsibilities, but with at least one former doj attorney describing mr. perez as a quote, radical radical who views the law as, quote, a nuisance, you can bet there's a fight over this man's nomination may get intense. chris stirewalt is our fox news digital power editor on power play.com live. tom perez's tenure heading up to the doj has been controversial to say the least, but he is beloved by those on the left as someone who embodies virtually all the principles they stand for. what does it say that president obama is proceeding with that nomination despite some of the controversies that emerged when he they floated the trial balloon earlier? >> well, in washington we can tell a lot more about somebody's intent by what they do than what they say. what we've heard a lot said of the white house of late is that they're interested in reaching out to r
polarization within the doj civil-rights unit. my next guest works at the doj before he resigned in 2010 over the department's dismissal of a new black panther party boater intimidation case. joining us now, former u.s. to pardon of justice attorney, author of the book in justice exposing the racial agenda of the obama justice department. good to have you with us. >> good to be here. lou: you have to feel vindicated by the doj inspector general's report. let's just share the findings. let me be clear, you have said that peres had provided false testimony. the ig report concludes and are we found the testimony did not reflect the entire story regarding the involvement of political appointees. we did not find press intentionally misled the commission. nevertheless, given he was testifying as an apartment witness before the commission we believe he should have some more details. your reaction? >> look. this is what we have been saying for years about this civil rights division. it has enormous power over business. call that a rat's nest. invested with racial animus. an inspector general report d
they were living in. they had to reflect the diversity of their workforce. it was a civil rights issue and also a business efficiency issue. we were dealing with domestic partnerships in other ways of trying to provide benefits and it was a complicated issue especially for companies with operations in multiple states. the feeling was let's do the right thing here, right for business, right for the human relations department, right for hiring right for retention right for civil rights. >> michael: your group, the chamber has supported gay marriage and gavin newsome battled to support it in francisco. was it a challenge to get people to agree to that? >> initially you might have thought like i did that maybe this was an issue that the community would not weigh in on. it was a non-direct business issue. we took it to public policy process with dozens of members who helped to form our public policy position to our board of directors over 06 members. unanimously directed the chamber to weigh in in the litigation of 2007, and we continue to do that on the most recent litigation. and it wasn'
. president obama wants the assistant attorney general for the justice department's civil rights division, thomas perez to be the next secretary of labor. mr. perez is seen by some to be a racial activist. here now to explain attorney and fox news anchor megyn kelly. you are actually covering this on your show. >> yeah. >> bill: that's high brow. >> we do some news on the news show. >> bill: nobody cares about the secretary of labor. most people don't care and i don't blame them. i don't care either. however, however, this appointment that president obama wants to make, this could be very telling about president obama. >> yeah. >> bill: tell me about perez. >> president obama's critics have been saying this sun necessarily divisive this choice. it would be hard to get somebody farther to the left than mr. perez and already some senators are threatening to try to block his confirmation because they believe he has been as one critic put it as quote a radical's radical. the deal with -- look, perez he went to harvard law school. he has experience in labor at the department of labor from mary
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
. >> this is a big historic moment. >> this is a basic civil rights issue. >> our colleague, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> immigration makes us stronger. it is part of what makes this such a dynamic country. >> no immigration reform is going to happen unless republicans in the house sign on to it. >> the time's come for comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. >> we are going to have a vote on assault weapons and we're going to have a vote on background checks. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. >> 90% of the public want something. >> i mean, it's insane the stuff he says. >> this isn't about wayne lapierre. it's about the public wanting to be safe on their streets. ♪ you don't need a weatherman to know it's where the wind blows ♪ >> it's a busy and wintery monday on the east coast. congress is on spring break as lawmakers return to their districts where they're likely to face constituents r
of labor. he comes directly from the department of justice where he's the head of the civil rights division, the division responsible for enforcing federal discrimination statutes. white house officials point to the fact that he helped settle the three largest fair lending cases in the department history as some of the reasons why he should be the head over at labor. however, republicans are pointing to a report issued by the department of justice's i.g. last week, the inspector general that basically said that division that perez leads is still in two camps. they're examples of harassment, inappropriate personnel attacks and the i.g.'s report basically found all those issues predate president obama's tenure in office. however, they really haven't been addressed to the satisfaction of the i.g., inspector general, thus far. mr. perez says he's worked with the department, that there have been improvements since he's taken office there but a number of republicans are pointing to this, especially senator grassley saying that mr. perez is woefully unprepared to answer questions about this. remem
his civil rights movement to a human rights movement. meaningful equality was not to be achieved through civil rights alone without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great a
is the object of civil rights movement. but they never have jojo as a child. but the reader identifies with horton. he's our man can ease our guy. he is our floppy nice element -- nice elephant who is saving someone like me. but he lives in the jungle with a kangaroo give this is not the readers everyday world. --t is the world of google of hooville. that is the world of dr. seuss's child reader. it's as if horton is a mega planet saving the tiny planet earth. or maybe given the socio- specificity of hooville, the modern west. so when the mayor urges for a last voice to make the hoos h crib somestarts on a path where a tiny figure dressed in crimson stands alone. his noses in the air. there is a smirk on his face. he knows what is going on and he doesn't care. he is the kind of child who in 50 stock is cruising for a bruising. who, in 1950s talk, is cruising for a bruising. the mayor grabs the young twerp. leading him up the tower and there is a wonderful bouncing scene where jojo is on the outstretched hand of the mayor and is ready to make a big statement. he clears his throat and he
to doma. this was john lewis, 1996, talking about the civil right, the right of a human being to marry another. their there has been a long struggle for civil right for gay and lesbian people. and there were people early on who recognized this was a fundamental civil rights issue. the reason people are coming to that view is because of people coming out in their countries and whether it is john roberts or other people in the country realizing that they are brothers and sisters and cousins of people who are gay and lesbian. and it is inevitable. watching ralph reed with the most ridiculous argument i've ever heard of the many ridiculous arguments against gay marriage. he's arguing the only reason people get player sid to have children. people get married because they want to be in a loving, committed relationship with each other. there is no reason that fundamental right should be denied. >> to steve's point, ralph reed was not discussing the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >>
series on civil rights continues with filmmaker, keith beauchamp. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ >> michael: a federal judge began hearing testimony today to determine if policemen have been stopping people unconstitutionally. defenders of the program state has brought down gun violence but they say at its core it is racial profiling that violates the constitution. joining me now is keith beauchamp, keith direct theed the documentary "the untold story of emmett louis till" and hosts the "the injustice files: hood of suspicion" which examines contemporary cases of racial profiling. keith welcome to "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> michael: keith, new york saw 419 murders last year. the lowest numbers since record keeping began in the 1960s, so is this a small price to pay for a safer community? >> i think it causes a bigger problem. you are talk about statistically if you look at these cases out of 1 in 1,000 cases of those stops, you have actual gun violations. when you take a look at the percentage of those being stopped, out of 90% there are no arrest o
. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
at the forefront of the discussion. many see them as the civil rights issues of our time. we must be a party that is welcoming and inconclusive for all voters. sean, put ago side how candidates look, does that mean you'll look for candidates that are more accepting for things like same-sex marriage? >> no, what it means and this is something that ronald reagan said in practice, which means my 80% sfrend not my 20% enemy. the principles are sound. is this not a question of how do we change the party or the principles. what it is, it's saying we as a party, if we want to grow and we want to win and govern again, at the presidential level, we've got to look at times and said, hey, you may not agree eye us on every single issue that the party has put out there, but we're willing to include you in the party as long as you understand. >> doesn't this conflict with some of the messaging we've heard from cpac over the weekend, though? >> there are personal some speakers at cpac who don't believe otherwise. i would argue while cpac does represent a good amount of people that believe in the republican
already had a conservative back lash building against the court from griswold and from civil rights and from miranda even. so it wasn't just this one decision that created that sort of back lash. and the other reason i don't think the parallel holds here is because people who believe, who are pro-life. who are staunchly pro-life, believe that abortion is tantamount to murder. no one thinks that gay marriage is like murder. so i don't think the emotions here run quite as high either. it is hard to imagine people really taking to the streets if doma were to be overturn at this time. >> yeah. and the other part of that is that while the emotions come from the grassroots, there has been a real shift among the political leadership in this country. when you look from president obama to president clinton to hillary clinton to rob portman to dick cheney, cleric mccaskill, jon huntsman. there are a tremendous number of federal officials, highly visible people in both parties. not only saying people should have this right, which is the moral position, but also saying something that i think cr
to marry, even from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way other issues divide the court. >> asia mills and jimmy la sylvia, director of go proud. good to see you both. >> thanks for having me. >> frank bruni said the final chapter of this story has in fact been written. the question isn't whether there will be a happy ending, the question is when. asia, is he right? >> absolutely. the tide has completely shifted on the as you announced earlier, the polling on marriage equality. we know this is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when. the states are moving this direction, it is a matter of time. >> even with the politicians, you see this move. jimmy, i was thinking about the fact that gay rights supporters weren't welcome at cpac, and you know who was, phyllis shaf lee, credited with turning back the equal rights amendment when in the '70s it seemed like a done deal. is it possible the celebrations are premature? >> i can tell you i agree, we have reached a tipping point on this. i was part of a
here at the law school. prior to joining aclu, he was the chief of the civil rights bureau and the office of the new york state attorney general. he spent 14 yes at the naacp legal defense fund where he supervised the litigation throughout theountry that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunit he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our seco speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor cy council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we
will nominate thomas harris as the new labor secretary. he heads the justice department civil rights division. he faced criticism for giving misleading testimony to the u.s. mission on civil rights. he would replace hilda sill lease. instead of eating while you were distracted you are consuming more calories. people who eat meals or snacks watching tv playing games or reading tend to eat more. >> i do believe that study. >> the u.s. postal service is $16 billion in debt and stopping saturday delivery to stay athroat they say. you wouldn't know it by the way the agency is spending millions to send workers to a lavish conference in california and it is happening this week. we have an inside look at the event. >> here at the annual postal forum executives will meet with thousands of shippers and those in the direct mail industry. and then everyone gets to have a good time in stan fran. there's a guolf outing dance an food from the fisherman's wharf and chinatowchinatown. the travel exhibit space and other incidentals will cost the postal service $2.2 million lass. the agency receives no tax doll
like this. it's a civil rights case, it seems like that would be the legacy that they want. but more curious things have happened in this court. let's go to doma for a second. >> the importance of doma says the federal government cannot deny federal benefits to people just because they are involved in a same-sex marriage. every single issue we are concerned about, whether it's lbgt worker's women boment baum care, all of those issues will be played out in the context of the immigration bill. in my point there is no point of bringing people out of the shadows only to make them second class citizens. it's all of us liberty and justice for all that has to happen. >> michael: yeah "politico" has an article out saying that there are these republican -- big doers in the republican party, that are going to give a lot more money if republicans start taking a stand that says -- that legalizes gay marriage in america. how big of factor is this, and do you believe it? >> i absolutely think there are gay republicans, some of them are my friends, that say it's tough for me.
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
. the supremes are hearing arguments on a new law that civil rights advocates. it is getting hot in the court and in the spin. it is a book that says take me with you. when did you know that grandma was the one? when her sister dumped me. grandpa was my dad a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. it's what you see is what you get food. guten tag. greetings earthlings. how you doin'? hola. sup. yello. howdy. what's crackalackin? it is great we express ourselves differently. if we were all the same, life would be boring. so get to know people who aren't like you. you'll appreciate what makes us different. the more you know. >>> the supreme court heard arguments today in a dispute over arizona's
luther king memorial in washington. the president, connecting one civil rights and human rights leader to another, it's the melting of history, disconnection, the connection of the civil rights movement. that's the president brought throughout his trip. >> the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. >> african-americans and jewish americans march with rabbis carrying as they walked. they boarded buses for freedom rights together. they bled together, gave their lives together. >> this is our obligation, not simply to bear witness but to act. for us, in our time, this means confronting bigotry and hatred in all of its forms. >> confronting it in all of its forms all over the world. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> shameless. let's play "hardball". ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. i hated the iraq war, said so when i s
that promise for everybody, the cause of his life. as a civil rights attorney, an aide to senator ted kennedy, a member of the montgomery, maryland county council, tom fought for a level playing field, where hard work and responsibility are rewarded and working families can get ahead. and this is not the first time that he's chosen to be a labor secretary, either. we've got here today governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed tom as secretary of maryland's department of labor where he helped implement the country's first statewide living wage law. because he understood that a minimum wage should be a wage that you can live on. in his current role as the head of the u.s. justice department's civil rights division, he fought to open pathways to the work fos for everybody willing to contribute, and he's helped settle some of the largest cases ever on behalf of families targeted by unfair mortgage lending. now while he's tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has also spent a career as a consensus builder. he's worked with ceos, he's worked with labor leaders, he's worked at federal, state and
a two-state solution, the president asserted that forging a lasting peace is a matter of civil rights. couching it the broader question of what it means to be a democracy. a return to the signature themes of the 2008 campaign and the early days of his presidency. as he outlined in cairo in 2009, the president began by affirming america's respect and its commitment. >> i've come here to cairo to seek a new beginning. between the united states and muslims around the world. one based on mutual interest and mutual respect. so long as there is a united states of america. [ speaking foreign language ] >> you are not alone. >> as he did in his landmark 2008 speech on race, the president argued that despite our differences, it is hope and the fundamental optimism about the next generation, that bonds us together. >> we may not look the same and may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction. towards a better future for our children. and our grandchildren. >> but before i, before i came here, i met with a group of young palestinians. i honestly believe tha
.org/possibilities. >>> tomorrow, the supreme court will begin hearing arguments in two of the biggest civil rights cases to reach its docket in years, if not in decades. up for consideration, doma, the so-called defense of marriage act, and california's proposition 8. as the court prepares for an historic moment, more public figures are weighing in. we can now add senator claire mccaskill of missouri and senator mark warner of virginia to the growing number of current and former lawmakers throwing their support behind marriage equality. senator mccaskill wrote, "i have come to the conclusion that our government should not limit the right to marry based on who you love. while churches should never be required to conduct marriages outside of their religious beliefs, neither should the government tell people who they have a right to marry." senator mark warner announced his support for marriage equality in a facebook post. "i support marriage equality because it is the fair and right thing to do." one of the two lawyers arguing against california's prop 8, david boyce, has predicted vark victory. >> i think we're g
, i'm tavis smiley. atn me next time as we look historic moment in the fight for civil rights with tyler branch. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more.
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
turned against the war in vietnam, twinned it with the civil rights movement -- chris: very much so. although they never gave an anti-war statement, lennon later with imagine, but they were part of the rebellion. anyway, here's my favorite of all. this is in the movie "yellow submarine." ♪ ah look at all the lonely people snotes ♪ ah look at all the lonely people ♪ ♪ eleanor rigby picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been ♪ ♪ lives in a dream ♪ waits at the window, wearing her face that she keeps in a jar by the door ♪ ♪ who is it for? ♪ crukes know that mixing of rhythms, that sound, it's so fascinating and all the lyrics came from going into a country church yard in liverpool and seeing names on the tombstones. father mckenzie, eleanor rigby. all that, chuck. >> it is great stuff and when i go back and look, especially the more training i've gotten in music, they actually are kind of timeless. my favorite is helter-skelter. you can listen to it now and think oh, is that a band today that put that out? they were so progressive in their music at t
of labor. he currently heads the civil rights division and would be the only hispanic in the president's second-term cabinet if confirmed. >>> police in india say five men have confessed to raping a swiss tourist. two more suspects are being sought here. >>> in canada, a daring escape from a quebec prison when two inmates suspended by cables flew to freedom at least temporarily. within hours police located the chopper and captured one of the men along with two other suspects. authorities saying the second fugitive was arrested overnight. >>> the faa is expected to make a final decision today on closing some air traffic control towers. 173 towers are on the chopping block as a result of the sequester. >>> boy or will? william and kate have different preferences and are apparently split when it comes to the gender of their baby due to july. the duchess told a guard during a medals ceremony that she would like a boy while prince william wants a girl. >>> and some of the most iconic images in green to celebrate st. patrick's day. sydney's famed opera house, pyramids, leaning tower of pisa
organizations who came together on this issue that represent our diverse ethnic community, civil rights, labor, social justice and religious organizations and ask for your support. madam clerk, could you call the roll. >> on item 35, supervisor mar? mar aye. supervisor tang? tang aye. supervisor wiener? wiener aye. supervisor avalos? avalos aye. supervisor breed? breed aye. supervisor campos? campos aye. supervisor chiu? chiu aye. supervisor cohen? cohen aye. supervisor kim? kim aye. there are nine ayes. >> the resolution is adopted. colleagues, we have one additional item on our calendar and that is our 3:30 special commendations related to women's history month. why don't i suggest that we recess for the next 10 minutes and reconvene at 3:30. with that, we are in recess. >>please stand by; meeting in recess
are plaintiffs in the biggest civil rights cases. on tuesday the u.s. supreme court will hear arguments and whether proposition 8 is unconstitutional. >> for a family, it is an important struggle and there has been sacrifice and at the same time it has been -- it is a huge honor. >> they will travel to washington, d.c. for the arguments and their twin sons will join them in the courtroom. and ktvu's david stevenson is heading to washington, d.c. to cover the arguments over prop 8 before the u.s. supreme court. we will have live reports from him throughout the day on monday and tuesday. >>> new tonight at 6:00 p.m. a lot of work going on at the golden gate bridge. ktvu's consumer editor tom vacar is live with what drives can expect, including a change with the speed limit there. tom? >> reporter: all of the changes, the best thing you can do is make sure you get yourself one of these. next wednesday morning the last toll takers will leave their booths forever. one basage message -- basic message. >> no more stopping at the toll plaza. >> reporter: people who use the golden gate bridge us
equality. and the marriage question, marriage equality, is a civil rights issue. and i think it has dawned on certain corners of the republican party they can no longer hold on to antiquated and perhaps bigoted views. but it is going to be tough, lawrence, as much as there is progress, there is a base that is very, very violently resisting entering into the modern era as far as this is concerned. >> and ari melber, of course what john boehner and lindsay graham and these guys who say i believe in marriage of one man and one woman, what they, of course, mean is they believe in a marriage of one man and as many women as he wants in sequence and one woman and as many men as she wants in sequence throughout her life, since, of course, they have absolutely no problem with divorce, which really upsets the old one man, one woman model. >> yeah. if you look at the demography of it, it has always been very weird that a country like the united states, which has high church attendance, but very low, you know, sustenance rates for marriage, has this sort of obsession. but i think what saxby may be try
is that this is like civil rights. that this is the civil rights movement moved to the gay and lesbian community. why is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. when our democratic institutions are capable of handling the issue. that's what the court will decide. whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case
for discriminating against latinos. he's a fighter for civil rights and as lake secretary, he'll stand up for the rights of the working class. thanks for much whatting. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> reince priebus. what more can i say? let's play "hardball." >>> good evening, i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with that bridge being detonated down in texas. wow. that's what reince priebus, himself, is doing to the republican party. he talks about building bridges to african-americans, but isn't he the same reince priebus who is chairman of the republican national committee and presided over a voter suppression effort in three dozen states, aimed at keeping african-americans from even voting? wasn't the country's number one birther, donald trump, speaker at the conservative convention? and wasn't that sarah palin letting loose with the latest crack about the need to check president obama's background? priebus talks about getting the true nature of the party out to the public. he says it's been a communications problem. wasn't the most excellent commu
in our party. >> but if certain voices seem intent to move forward on civil rights, the party's right flank is digging in its heels. >> young conservatives, 30 and under, 35 and under, gay marriage, all that matters. homosexual marriage. if the party makes that something official, that they support, they're not going to pull the homosexual activist voters away from the democrat party. but they are going to -- cause their base to stay home. and throw their hands up in utter frustration. >> similar frustration was echoed by evangelicals and social conservatives. family reform council president tony perkins has wrote this week, raince priebus's has decided that the way for his party -- >> president of the national organization for marriage, brian brown, sass the grassroots of the party are 100% committed to protecting marriage and you can't just kick them to the curb. >> and according to faith and freedom coalition founder, raffle reed, if the republican party tries to retreat from being a pro marriage, pro family party, the big tent is going to become a pup tent very fast. >> will repub
-- >> yes. and civil rights. he said to all of them, i agree with all of your positions. i want all of your things. but i have to tell you something, i'm not going to be able to do it. and i'm not going to do it. you're going to have to make me do it. he said that to them, make me do it. so fellow americans, that's our job. if we are calling ourselves citizens, that means we are participants in democracy. it is not that they sit back and they sit in some hall some place. we are the ones in charge. they are our servant. they are there to serve us. if they don't hear from us, then you know, who is going to win out are the money people. the gun manufacturers, national rifle association, people that grease the palms. that's who will win out. but this is what the nra is scared about tonight and gun manufacturers. there's a lot more of us than there are of them. >> no doubt. so they won't be able to hold us hostage. let's talk about something else you're doing, because i want to get this in. first i thought you were making house party part 4 but i discovered that's not what is going on. you are g
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 230 (some duplicates have been removed)